Jessica Thompson

  • Drawing a Line

    2010 and 2011

    Performance

    Drawing a Line: Scajaquada Creek was a duration-based performance where I traced the pathway of a buried section of the Scajacquada Creek in Buffalo, NY using a push broom and water from the creek itself. In April, I created a second version of this performance at Broadview and Queen, the neighbourhood where my father grew up, using water drawn from the Don River.  In the performance, I performed a series of actions to mark the location of 7 Napier Street, where my family lived from 1954 – 65. In 1968 homes on Napier, Munro, and Thompson Street were destroyed in order for the city to construct the Don Mount Court Housing Complex, which was demolished and turned into small single-family homes, not unlike the ones that were destroyed. In the performance, lines were drawn in segments by pouring water from a bucket and pushing it with the broom until the line disappears. As the gesture was repeated, the line gradually evaporated, leaving no trace of the activity.  By marking the location of buried streams and demolished streets, our understanding of public space becomes more nuanced, drawing together personal history, public policy, gentrification, and migration.

    SOLD

  • Drawing a Line

    2010 and 2011

    Performance

    Drawing a Line: Scajaquada Creek was a duration-based performance where I traced the pathway of a buried section of the Scajacquada Creek in Buffalo, NY using a push broom and water from the creek itself. In April, I created a second version of this performance at Broadview and Queen, the neighbourhood where my father grew up, using water drawn from the Don River.  In the performance, I performed a series of actions to mark the location of 7 Napier Street, where my family lived from 1954 – 65. In 1968 homes on Napier, Munro, and Thompson Street were destroyed in order for the city to construct the Don Mount Court Housing Complex, which was demolished and turned into small single-family homes, not unlike the ones that were destroyed. In the performance, lines were drawn in segments by pouring water from a bucket and pushing it with the broom until the line disappears. As the gesture was repeated, the line gradually evaporated, leaving no trace of the activity.  By marking the location of buried streams and demolished streets, our understanding of public space becomes more nuanced, drawing together personal history, public policy, gentrification, and migration.

    SOLD

  • Drawing a Line

    2010 and 2011

    Performance

    Drawing a Line: Scajaquada Creek was a duration-based performance where I traced the pathway of a buried section of the Scajacquada Creek in Buffalo, NY using a push broom and water from the creek itself. In April, I created a second version of this performance at Broadview and Queen, the neighbourhood where my father grew up, using water drawn from the Don River.  In the performance, I performed a series of actions to mark the location of 7 Napier Street, where my family lived from 1954 – 65. In 1968 homes on Napier, Munro, and Thompson Street were destroyed in order for the city to construct the Don Mount Court Housing Complex, which was demolished and turned into small single-family homes, not unlike the ones that were destroyed. In the performance, lines were drawn in segments by pouring water from a bucket and pushing it with the broom until the line disappears. As the gesture was repeated, the line gradually evaporated, leaving no trace of the activity.  By marking the location of buried streams and demolished streets, our understanding of public space becomes more nuanced, drawing together personal history, public policy, gentrification, and migration.

    SOLD